Solar Ephemeris


Sunday 5th July 2020 for Bristol, UK


The Sun's Position in GEMINI


The Solar Information for today


Solar Ecliptic Longitude: 104.1244 Degrees
RA of the Sun: 7 hrs 1 mins 20 secs
Declination of the Sun: 22 degs 41 mins 0 secs
The Sun is in Constellation of: GEMINI
Solar Altitude: 29.914 Degrees
Solar Azimuth: 269.554 Degrees
Sun Transits at: 01:15 pm
The Sun Rises at: 05:02 am
The Sun Sets at: 09:29 pm
Civil Twilight Begins at: 04:15 am
Civil Twilight Ends at: 10:15 pm
Nautical Twilight Begins at: 03:05 am
Nautical Twilight Ends at: 11:25 pm
Astronomical Twilight Begins at: 01:00 am
Astronomical Twilight Ends at: 01:00 am

Civil Twilight

Is a scientific term, and we define it as “the period after sunset or before sunrise ending or beginning when the sun is about 6 degrees below the horizon and during which on clear days there is enough light for ordinary outdoor occupations.


Nautical Twilight

The term dates back to when sailors used the stars for navigation, because during nautical twilight – the spell when the sun is between 6 and 12 degrees below the horizon – most stars can be seen with the naked eye. Nautical dusk is the moment the sun reaches 12 degrees below.


Astronomcal Twilight

The sun is between 12 and 18 degrees below the horizon, and this is the spell when there is still a little light in the sky, but before true dark. After astronomical dusk at 18 degrees below, all stars will be visible.


Equitorial

This diagram shows the definition of the Right Ascension and Declination co-ordinates on the sky. Right Ascension is measured from the Vernal Equinox, (First Point of Aries - 0 Degrees) where the sun crosses the Equator Line (as projected across the sky) going from South to North. The value of Right Ascension is given in hours, minutes and seconds by dividing the angle of an object in the sky from the First Point of Aries by 15 (The number of degrees the earth moves in one hour. The declination angle is therefore the angle up towards the North Pole axis projected into the sky. Image via Wikimedia Commons